Jung-Hsin Lin
Dr. rer. nat.

Research Fellow
Division of Mechanics, Research Center for Applied Sciences &
Institute of Biomedical Sciences
Academia Sinica

Associate Professor
School of Pharmacy
National Taiwan University

Room 1236, 12F No.1 Jen-Ai Road Sec. 1
Taipei, 100, Taiwan
TEL: +886 2 2312 3456 ext 88404
FAX: +886 2 2391 9098
E-Mail: jlin@ntu.edu.tw
Website at Academia Sinica: http://www.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/faculty/jhlin.html http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/pages/pi/index.php?id=46

Professional Experiences

2000.9-2002.-8
Bioinformatics Specialist,
Howard Hughes Medical Institute,
University of California at San Diego, U.S.A.

2000.1-2000.9
Postdoctoral Research Associate,
John von Neuman Institute for Computing,
Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany

2002.9-2002.11
Visiting Scholar
Institute for Bioinformation Processing-2
Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany

2002.12-2003.1
Visiting Scholar
Computing Centre
Academia Sinica

1993.2-1994.5
System and Database Administrator
Information Center
Army Headquarter, R.O.C.

1994.8-1996.7
Lab Teaching Assistant
Department of Physics
National Taiwan University

Education

1996.10-2000.1
Dr. rer. nat. (Ph.D. in Biophysics)
Institute of Physics
University of Duisburg
Germany

1990.9-1992.6
M.Sc.
Graduate Institute of Physics
National Taiwan University

1986.10-1990.6
Department of Physics
National Taiwan University


My research area focuses on statistical mechanics of biological macromoleculese. e.g, proteins, nucleic acids, membranes, and drugs. A major effort has been on the development and application of computer models and simulation methods for molecular systems. Particular research problems include study of atomic mobility in proteins and membranes by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo computer simulations; quantitative modeling of recognition and binding in ligand-receptor systems with solvation effects; development of methods for computing free energy change efficiently in solution phase processes; calculation of diffusion constants and diffusion encounter rates of rigid and flexible molecules in solution and onto biomembranes by Brownian dynamics simulations; modeling of subcellular and cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, and cytoskeletal dynamics.